Fast Company Magazine

Articles from Fast Company Magazine

San Francisco is radically redesigning a major street to get rid of cars

Source: Fast Company Magazine On:

Read On

The city just approved a plan to redesign Market Street, making it safer for pedestrians, adding protected bike lanes, and eliminating private vehicles to help speed up buses and lower the injury count on the street.

San Francisco’s Market Street, which leads from the city’s iconic Ferry Building through the financial district and past shops, hotels, office buildings such as Twitter’s headquarters, and the plaza in front of City Hall, can be a terrifying place to ride a bike. But the city just voted to radically transform the street’s design to make it safer, including new, fully separated bike lanes—and totally eliminating private cars on a 2.2-mile stretch of the street.

Read Full Story

Sony’s 360 “spatial” audio will stream soon on Amazon, Tidal, and Deezer

Source: Fast Company Magazine On:

Read On

More than 1,000 songs from the likes of Pharrell Williams and Bob Dylan will stream in the new format, which rethinks the left-right audio paradigm.

Sony says the new “360 Reality Audio” audio format it announced at CES in January will become available to consumers yet this fall on Amazon HD, Tidal, Deezer, and nugs.net.

Read Full Story

How to watch the Democratic debate free on CNN live without cable

Source: Fast Company Magazine On:

Read On

The 2020 Democratic debate is back and bigger than ever. Still paying attention? Here’s how to stream it live.

The latest Democratic debate of the 2020 primaries is taking place this evening, and this time it’s bigger than ever. No fewer than 12 presidential hopefuls will cram themselves onto the debate stage at Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio, where they will face questions from Erin Burnett and Anderson Cooper of CNN and Marc Lacey of the New York Times.

Read Full Story

How Durham is using user-testing to design a compost system that works

Source: Fast Company Magazine On:

Read On

The city is starting small, figuring out how people use the system—and how they break it—as it slowly rolls it out to more and more residents.

In the city of Durham, North Carolina, roughly 30% of the garbage residents throw away is compostable. Two-thirds of that is food scraps (the rest comes from paper products). The problem: Like most municipalities, the city doesn’t offer a residential composting program. And not everyone has the space or desire to build their own slightly stinky backyard bins.

Read Full Story

5 unique ways candidates have made themselves stand out in the job application process

Source: Fast Company Magazine On:

Read On

When it comes to job applications, a little creativity can go a long way.

Recently, Basecamp posted five new job openings. For those five openings, they received more than 4,000 applications. Notably, more than 1,400 people applied for their Head of Marketing role, and more than 2,000 applied for two open Customer Support Representative positions.

Read Full Story

It was inevitable: the scooters are now driving themselves

Source: Fast Company Magazine On:

Read On

They’re not being ridden by ghosts but rather remotely controlled by human operators working for a new e-scooter technology company called Tortoise that wants to make charging and repositioning the micromobility devices a little easier.

Shared bike and e-scooter programs hold a lot of promise—they could get city residents out of their cars and into the groove of embracing emissions-free transportation. But that’s not going to happen if the backlash against scooters—critics say they clutter sidewalks, impede and endanger pedestrians, and are just plain annoying—continues. It’s also not going to happen if scooter riders can’t locate a scooter when they need one most. You can’t substitute a scooter for your car if there isn’t a scooter anywhere nearby when you need it.

Read Full Story

These are all the ways that remote working is stressing you out

Source: Fast Company Magazine On:

Read On

Remote working may provide flexibility, but it can also make you more prone to blurring work-life boundaries.

Remote working is becoming more popular than ever. A study released by the Swiss office provider IWG found that 70% of professionals work remotely at least one day a week, while 53% work remotely for at least half of the week. Some multinationals have their entire staff working remotely, with no fixed office presence at all, which can result in having employees situated all over the world.

Read Full Story